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Go 'Green' By Choosing the Right Mail Delivery System

Friday November 01, 2019

When developing a neighborhood or residential community, you should consider choosing a green mail delivery system. This doesn't mean that you should literally install green-colored mailboxes. Rather, you should "go green" by choosing an environmentally friendly mail delivery system. By doing your part, you'll promote a cleaner Earth while helping residents send and collect their respective mail in the process.

Full-Service vs Limited-Service Mailboxes: What's the Difference?

Thursday October 03, 2019

When choosing curbside mailboxes to use in your neighborhood or residential community, one of the decisions you'll have to make is whether to use full-service or limited-service mailboxes. The United States Postal Service (USPS) allows for both types of mailboxes. You can find full-service and limited-service mailboxes available in contemporary and traditional designs. So, what's the difference between these two types of mailboxes?

How Do Cluster Box Units (CBUs) Work?

Monday September 16, 2019

Cluster Box Units (CBUs) have become an increasingly popular alternative to conventional curbside mailboxes. A form of centralized mail delivery, they consist of "clusters" of multiple mailbox compartments, each of which is intended for a specific household or residence in the surrounding area. Unless you're familiar with CBUs, though, you might be wondering how they work. In this post, we're going to reveal the basics of CBUs, revealing why they've become so popular in recent years.

The Complete Guide to Centralized Mail Delivery Systems

Monday September 02, 2019

Don't limit yourself to choosing traditional curbside mailboxes for your neighborhood or residential community. While the United States Postal Service (USPS) allows curbside mailboxes to be used for single-unit residences, an alternative solution is to use a centralized mail delivery system. Since their origins back in the mid- to late 1960s, centralized mail delivery systems have become increasingly common -- and for good reason. Unless you're familiar with them, though, you might be wondering whether a centralized mail delivery system is a smart choice for your neighborhood or residential community.

STD-4C Mailboxes: How They Differ From the Old STD-4B Standard

Monday August 19, 2019

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has been encouraging homeowners and business owners to use centralized mail delivery systems for decades. In 1967, the USPS introduced the first residential curbside Cluster Box Units (CBUs). A form of centralized mail delivery, CBUs streamlined the delivery of mail by providing mail couriers with a single drop-off point for multiple residences. Since then, the USPS has released specifications for other forms of centralized mail delivery systems, including STD-4B and the newer STD-4C.

Cluster Box Units vs STD-4C Mailboxes: What's the Difference?

Monday July 15, 2019

Cluster Box Units (CBUs) and STD-4C mailboxes are two popular alternatives to traditional curbside mailboxes. A form of centralized mail delivery, they allow couriers to drop off and pick up mail at a single unit rather than accessing each tenant's curbside mailbox. While CBUs and STD-4C mailboxes are similar in this regard, however, they aren't necessarily the same. If you're thinking about purchasing either of these centralized mail delivery systems for your neighborhood or residential community, you should familiarize yourself with the differences between CBUs and STD-4C mailboxes.

Traditional Mailboxes vs Contemporary Mailboxes: What's the Difference?

Friday June 07, 2019

When shopping for curbside mailboxes for your neighborhood or residential community, you may discover some labeled as "traditional" or "contemporary." Traditional styles are the most common, accounting for the majority of residential mailboxes in the United States. But in recent years, an increasing number of contemporary mailboxes have emerged, offering a viable alternative for community developers and homeowners alike. So, what's the difference between traditional and contemporary mailboxes?

USPS Color Requirements for Curbside Mailboxes: What You Should Know

Monday May 20, 2019

When purchasing curbside mailboxes for a neighborhood or residential community, you'll need to choose an appropriate color. The United States Postal Service (USPS) is pretty flexible regarding the color of curbside mailboxes, but there are still a few things you'll need to know. By complying with the USPS's color requirements, you can avoid the headache of having to replace or repaint your mailboxes in the future.

Guidelines to Follow When Installing Apartment Mailboxes

Monday May 13, 2019

There are now over 2 million apartment buildings in the United States, according to a Rental Housing Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. If you're faced with the task of developing or renovating an apartment building, you might be wondering what type of mailboxes you should use. With multiple residences per each apartment building, traditional curbside mailboxes aren't practical. Instead, you'll need to choose a more convenient and easily accessible type of mailbox that complies with the United States Postal Service's (USPS's) guidelines.

How to Discourage Mail Theft in a New Neighborhood or Community

Monday April 08, 2019

If you're developing a new neighborhood or residential community, you might be wondering what precautions you can take to protect residents from mail theft. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), approximately 400,000 Americans have their mail stolen in any given year. For residents, mail theft isn't just frustrating; it poses a risk to their credit and reputation. After taking a resident's mail, a thief may steal his or her identity, using the resident's Social Security number and other personal information to open new credit cards. As a developer, though, there are a few ways you can discourage mail theft in a new neighborhood or residential community.